Jame Ingo Freed Time Machine

OUT OF PRODUCTION!

JAMES INGO FREED TIME MACHINE, 1998

Jame Ingo Freed Time Machine is 1/3 United States Holocaust Museum, 1/3 itself, and 1/3 San Francisco Main Library. The structure of the watch is different than the structure of a building. Building structure design is meant to keep the building stable, watch structure wants to move in order to inform.”  James Ingo Freed was a partner in the firm, Pei, Cobb, Freed and Partners.

James Ingo Freed Time Machine was was based upon the astrolabe; a device used for telling time before the toothed gear was invented.

BUILDING TIMEPIECES

The inspiration behind the watches in this collection is as varied as the architectural and design talent it brings together.   James Ingo Freed’s “Time Machine” is based on the astrolabe, which dates back to the late 15th century. An instrument that served primarily for determining the altitude of the stars, moon, and sun. It went out of use because it was incapable of great precision. No clock could have been constructed before the toothed gear.

For Antoine Predock, it was the Pantheon in Rome that gave rise to the design of his watch. The “High Museum Watch,” designed by Richard Meier, focuses on the interplay of space and light, reflecting the essence of the Museum’s soul. Coop Himmel(b)au’s “Vision of Johanna” is a replication of the firm’s Groninger Museum design. Francois de Menil’s “Contemplation Watch” draws our attention to the passage of large units of time, i.e., centuries: the raised number 13 represents the century in which the Fresco murals were created; the raised 20 represents the century in which the Frescos were transposed through his Chapel Museum project.

BUILDING TIMEPIECES

The inspiration behind the watches in this collection is as varied as the architectural and design talent it brings together.   James Ingo Freed’s “Time Machine” is based on the astrolabe, which dates back to the late 15th century. An instrument that served primarily for determining the altitude of the stars, moon, and sun. It went out of use because it was incapable of great precision. No clock could have been constructed before the toothed gear.

For Antoine Predock, it was the Pantheon in Rome that gave rise to the design of his watch. The “High Museum Watch,” designed by Richard Meier, focuses on the interplay of space and light, reflecting the essence of the Museum’s soul. Coop Himmel(b)au’s “Vision of Johanna” is a replication of the firm’s Groninger Museum design. Francois de Menil’s “Contemplation Watch” draws our attention to the passage of large units of time, i.e., centuries: the raised number 13 represents the century in which the Fresco murals were created; the raised 20 represents the century in which the Frescos were transposed through his Chapel Museum project.

It is this kind of attention to detail that makes James Ingo Freed’s Time Machine and every watch in the collection unique.

James Indigo Freed

James Indigo Freed

Two decades after receiving his architectural degree from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1953, James Ingo Freed returned to his alma mater as dean of the School of Architecture. Committed to education, he has been a visiting lecturer, critic, and jurist at colleges across the country. Widely published in professional journals and books, he was responsible for the design of the Jacob Javits Convention Center in New York as well as a variety of other Pei Cobb Freed & Partners commissions.

  • Brunner Prize, American Academy of Arts and Letters
  • 1995 National Medal of Arts, National Endowment for the Arts
  • Lifetime Achievement Award, New York Society of Architects, 1992
  • Fellow, American Institute of Architects

"Time Machine" is 1/3 United States Holocaust Museum, 1/3 itself, and 1/3 San Francisco Main Library. The structure of the watch is different than the structure of a building. Building structure design is meant to keep the building stable, watch structure wants to move in order to inform."

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